Police: 2 targeted in deadly shooting at Vegas casino picnicApril 16, 2018 11:30pm

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Police were searching Monday for a man accused of opening fire on a picnic for a group of employees of a Las Vegas Strip casino-resort, killing a woman and critically injuring a man this weekend in what investigators called workplace violence.

Authorities say Anthony Wrobel walked up to a table in the gazebo area of a park Sunday evening and shot an executive and a fellow employee of The Venetian at close range. Police said Wrobel, 42, has been described as a disgruntled employee of the casino-resort, where he has worked for 14 years.

A woman in her 50s was killed, and a man, also in his 50s, was being treated for critical wounds. It wasn't immediately clear which victim was the executive.

"This appears to be an isolated event of workplace violence and detectives believe the victims were specifically targeted," police said in a statement. A motive for the shooting is unclear.

Employees of one department at the casino-resort had gathered at the park near McCarran International Airport.

Police said Wrobel fled after the shooting and his vehicle was found a short time later in the parking garage at the airport. Police are asking people with information about Wrobel's whereabouts to contact authorities.

No attorney or publicly listed phone number was immediately available for Wrobel.

Las Vegas Sands Corp. operates the luxury casino-resort on the Strip. Spokesman Ron Reese said the company is cooperating with authorities and not commenting further because of the ongoing investigation.

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