10 Things to Know for FridayOctober 13, 2017 12:16am

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Friday:

1. WHAT SOUNDS SORT OF LIKE CRICKETS

The AP obtains a recording of what some U.S. Embassy workers heard in Havana in a series of unnerving incidents later deemed to be deliberate attacks.

2. SHOOTOUT ENDS WITH FREEDOM FOR CAPTIVES

Five years after being taken hostage in Afghanistan, an American woman and her Canadian husband are free, along with their three children, after a dramatic confrontation between their captors and Pakistani forces.

3. FRUSTRATED BY CONGRESS, TRUMP GOES IT ALONE

The president wields his rule-making power to launch an end run that might get him closer to his goal of repealing and replacing "Obamacare."

4. WHO SAYS HE'S NOT LEAVING TEAM TRUMP

Seeking to counter the perception of a chaotic White House, chief of staff John Kelly makes a rare public appearance to declare he's staying in his post.

5. GRIM WORK BEGINS IN WILDFIRES' WAKE

Search-and-rescue teams, some with cadaver dogs, start looking for bodies in parts of California wine country devastated by wildfires.

6. WHY POLICE ARE REVIEWING THEIR FILES

Detectives in New York City and London are taking a fresh look into sexual assault allegations targeting Harvey Weinstein now that some 30 women have accused him of inappropriate conduct.

7. UNESCO LOSING A BIG PLAYER

The U.S. declares it is pulling out of the U.N.'s educational, scientific and cultural agency because of what Washington sees as its bias against Israel.

8. PANEL ENDORSES GENE THERAPY FOR FORM OF BLINDNESS

If approved by the FDA, it would be the first gene therapy in the U.S. for an inherited disease and the first in which a corrective gene is given directly to patients.

9. HOW BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN IS BROADENING HIS HORIZONS

Stepping back from the perch of rock stardom, the musician offers an intimate look at his life in a new Broadway show.

10. COWBOYS STAR COULD BE FORCED TO SIT

A federal appeals court lifts an injunction that blocked a six-game suspension for Dallas running back Ezekiel Elliott.

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