49ers: Foster to miss offseason program for legal issuesApril 16, 2018 2:37am

SANTA CLARA, Calif. (AP) — San Francisco 49ers linebacker Reuben Foster won't participate in the offseason program while he tends to legal matters related to his domestic violence charges.

The 49ers said in a joint statement Sunday from owner Jed York, coach Mike Shanahan and general manager John Lynch that Foster's future with the team will be "determined by the information revealed during the legal process." San Francisco begins its offseason program Monday.

Foster was charged Thursday with felony domestic violence after being accused of dragging his girlfriend and punching her in the head, leaving her with a ruptured eardrum, authorities said.

Prosecutors said the 24-year-old Foster attacked his girlfriend in February at their Los Gatos home, leaving her bruised and with an injured eardrum.

The 28-year-old woman told responding officers that Foster dragged her by her hair, physically threw her out of the house, and punched her in the head eight to 10 times.

Foster was also charged with felony possession of an assault weapon and misdemeanor possession of a high-capacity magazine after officers found a Sig Sauer 516 short-barreled rifle in his home while investigating his girlfriend's domestic violence report.

If convicted on all charges, He faces up to 11 years in prison.

The 49ers drafted Foster 31st overall last year after questions about his health and character caused him to drop from being a possible top 10 pick.

Foster delivered on the field, ranking second on the team with 72 tackles in 10 games as a rookie and looking like a key part of San Francisco's defensive future.

Foster then was charged in January in Alabama with second-degree marijuana possession before the incident in February that led to the most recent charges.

The NFL has said it is looking into possible discipline for Foster for both infractions.

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