New plastic Jane Austen 10-pound note launched in UKSeptember 14, 2017 11:22am

LONDON (AP) — A new plastic 10-pound note featuring Jane Austen, one of Britain's most renowned authors, has gone into circulation.

Apart from the Queen, whose portrait is on all U.K. currency, Austen is only the third woman to feature on a modern-day British banknote, after medical innovator Florence Nightingale and social reformer Elizabeth Fry. She was chosen after a campaign for more female representation.

The new 'tenner,' as it's commonly known, is the first British banknote with a tactile feature, a series of raised dots in the top left-hand corner to help blind and partially sighted users.

The note is made of polymer and is the central bank's latest effort to make cash harder to counterfeit, following last year's launch of a similar five-pound note that showcases Winston Churchill. A new 20-pound note featuring artist JMW Turner will follow in 2020.

"Our banknotes serve as repositories of the country's collective memory, promoting awareness of the United Kingdom's glorious history and highlighting the contributions of its greatest citizens," said Bank of England Governor Mark Carney. "Austen's novels have a universal appeal and speak as powerfully today as they did when they were first published."

Austen, whose novels include "Pride and Prejudice," ''Emma," and "Sense and Sensibility," is considered one of the great chroniclers of English country life in the Georgian era at the turn of the 19th century. Combining wit, romance and social commentary, her books have been adapted numerous times for television and film.

As well as a portrait of Austen, the note features a quote from "Pride and Prejudice": "I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading!"

New security features on the tenners — which at a value of about $13 each can buy a couple pints of beer or, at a stretch, a pair of Austen novels — will make them more difficult to counterfeit, the bank said.

The transition to polymer has sparked controversy after the central bank confirmed that a small amount of tallow, or animal fat, was used in the production process. But in August, following a public consultation, the bank said it would stick to the composition of the banknotes as the only viable alternative was using palm oil, which raised questions related to environmental sustainability and value for money.

"It is wonderful to see the inspirational author Jane Austen celebrated," said Victoria Cleland, the Bank of England's chief cashier. "And even more poignant being launched during the 200th anniversary of her death."

Page 1 of 1

More Stories Like This

From left, Britain's chief Brexit negotiator David Davis, Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond and Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson attend a speech by Prime Minister Theresa May, in Florence, Italy, Friday Sept. 22, 2017. May will try Friday to revive foundering Brexit talks — and unify her fractious government — by proposing a two-year transition after Britain's departure from the European Union in 2019 during which the U.K. would continue to pay into the bloc's coffers. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino, Pool)
May tries to reboot Brexit, offers 2-year transition period
A screenshot taken from a smartphone on Friday Sept. 22, 2017 of the Uber app showing their cars driving in and around Camden Town, London. London's transport authority said Friday it won't renew Uber's license to operate in the British capital, arguing that it demonstrates a lack of corporate responsibility with implications in public safety and security. (AP Photo)
In new setback, Uber to lose license to work in London
An Uber App is displayed on a phone in London, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017. London's transport authority said Friday it won't renew Uber's license to operate in the British capital, arguing that it demonstrates a lack of corporate responsibility with implications in public safety and security. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
London mayor: Uber to blame for loss of license in city
In this Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017 photo, British playwright James Graham poses for a photograph, outside The Duke of York's Theatre which is currently showing his play 'Ink', in London. Rupert Murdoch has power, wealth _ and legions of detractors, who say the media mogul's tabloids and TV stations have fueled crass celebrity culture, phone hacking and fake news. A new play in London explores the roots of his success and his divisiveness. Ink" shows how Murdoch revolutionized British journalism, turning the failing Sun newspaper into the country's most influential tabloid through a mix of sin, sensation and sex. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
The Sun rises in new play about Murdoch's tabloid revolution
Eurozone growth hopes reinforced by strong surveyA closely watched survey is showing that the eurozone economy, made up of the 19 countries that use the euro currency, has ended the third quarter on a strong note, in a development that further reinforces hopes about the state of the region's recovery
French President French President Emmanuel Macron walks out of the Elysee Palace as he awaits European Parliament President Antonio Tajani in Paris, France, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
Britain hopes for Brexit progress; EU leaders cautious
This component is currently unavailable.
AdChoices

Related Searches

Related Searches

AdChoices