'LOVE' returns: Philadelphia park gets its sculpture backFebruary 13, 2018 8:11pm

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — "LOVE" returned to Philadelphia on Tuesday, just in time for Valentine's Day.

The famous 1976 Robert Indiana sculpture was brought back to its namesake downtown park on a flatbed truck after making a number of stops at parks and statues along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway before the reinstallation.

School children cheered and those gathered spontaneously sang the fight song for the Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles as a forklift placed the sculpture atop a pedestal.

Susan Murphy had the day off from work and came to the park to see the sculpture reinstalled. She played the Beatles "All You Need is Love" on her iPhone and sang along with her new pal Caitlin Night, who swung by take photos of what she called "the symbol of our city."

"This is what we are known for, and it's wonderful to have the 'LOVE' back," Murphy said. "The city seemed empty without it."

The sculpture was temporarily installed at nearby City Hall in 2016 while Love Park was going through a renovation.

It was taken out of view a year ago for repairs ahead of the park's reopening.

The perennial tourist attraction and engagement photo backdrop looks a bit different. It's been repainted to the original colors of red, green and purple that the artist originally used. At some point over the decades, the purple had been repainted blue.

Deborah Rickards, who teaches third grade at nearby Friends Select School, brought her class over to see the statue's return.

"We consider the city to be part of our campus and all of these kids know the LOVE statue," she said.

Student Caroline DeFalco said she thinks the statue is one of the city's best.

"I missed it," she said. "It's a really big part of Philadelphia."

Page 1 of 1

More Stories Like This

Objects using imagery of Native Americans are on display at the "Americans" exhibit at the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian, Friday, Feb. 9, 2018, in Washington. A new exhibit uses images of Natives to show how the population permeates American culture. The "Americans" exhibit has received good reviews, but some say the accompanying website falls short in its characterization of an 1830 U.S. law that forced thousands of American Indians off their lands.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
New exhibit examines Native American imagery in US culture
FILE - In this Jan. 16, 2008, file photo, a female polar bear named Coldilocks plays with a container at the Philadelphia Zoo in Philadelphia. Coldilocks, who was the oldest captive polar bear in the U.S., has been euthanized following a serious decline in the 37-year-old polar bear's health, zoo officials said Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018. Coldilocks was born at the Seneca Park Zoo in Rochester, N.Y., on Dec. 13, 1980, arriving at the Philadelphia Zoo on Oct. 6, 1981. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
Coldilocks, the oldest captive polar bear in the US, dies
Commuter bus and tractor-trailer collide in Philly, 15 hurtA commuter bus and a tractor-trailer have collided in Philadelphia, sending 15 people to a hospital
Taco Bell cashier out after putting racial slur on receiptTaco Bell says an employee accused of using a racial slur to refer to an Asian-American customer no longer works for the restaurant chain
FILE - In this June 25, 2017, file photo, actor Michael Keaton attends the "Spider-Man: Homecoming" cast photo call at The Whitby Hotel in New York. Keaton is slated to give the commencement address on May 12, 2018, at Ohio's Kent State University. (Photo by Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP, File)
Actor Michael Keaton to give Kent State commencement address
Mari Copeny, third from left, watches a free screening of the film "Black Panther" with more than 150 children, after she raised $16,000 to provide free tickets in an entire theater on Monday, Feb. 19, 2018 in Flint Township, Mich. As "Black Panther" debuts in theaters across the U.S., educators, philanthropist, celebrities and business owners are pulling together their resources to bring children of color to see the film that features a black superhero in a fictional, un-colonized African nation. (Jake May /The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP)
Stars, educators lead effort for kids to see 'Black Panther'
This component is currently unavailable.
AdChoices

Related Searches

Related Searches

AdChoices