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Dartmouth to study opioid treatment for pregnant womenA research team at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine is getting $5.3 million to study medication-assisted treatment for pregnant women with opioid use disorders
The Associated Press11 hours ago
Coal lay on a poster with slogan 'Stop Coal', during demonstration demanding the end of burning coal to produce electricity, in Berlin, Germany, Sunday, June 24, 2018. (Paul Zinken/dpa via AP)
Hundreds march in Berlin to demand an end to using coalHundreds of people are marching through the German capital to protest for an end to burn coal to produce electricity
The Associated Press12 hours ago
One Kind of Parenting Is 'Form of Abusiveness'Helicopter parenting usually gets a bad rap , and this is no exception. A recent study suggests that children who are more controlled by mothers will end up struggling with their emotions, impulses, and schoolwork later on, the Guardian reports. Published in Developmental Psychology , the study followed 422 children over an...
Newser1 day ago
Houston heart transplant hospital could lose Medicaid fundsA Houston hospital that suspended its renowned heart transplant program for two weeks amid scrutiny following the deaths of two patients could lose federal Medicaid funding
The Associated Press1 day ago
Pastor Danny Daniels poses for a photo inside his Better Life Community Church in Lindsay, Okla., Friday, June 15, 2018. Daniels is among a growing group of traditionally conservative Republican voters who have shifted their position in favor of medical marijuana and who could ensure passage on Tuesday of the first medical marijuana state question on a ballot this year. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Oklahoma conservatives' views on medical marijuana evolvingHere's a twist: Evangelical Christians in Oklahoma could be the reason medical marijuana is approved on Tuesday
The Associated Press1 day ago
The State With the Most PsychopathsSurprise, surprise: The place home to the most psychopaths in the US is Washington, DC. By far. That's according to new research out of Southern Methodist University. The survey doesn't count actual diagnoses but extrapolates from earlier research on the distribution of the "big five" personality traits (extraversion, neuroticism, agreeableness,...
Newser1 day ago
Dying Man Gets His Day in Court Against MonsantoDeWayne Johnson is going to die—but first, he will see the company he blames for his cancer in court. Johnson, a 46-year-old father of three, is the first of hundreds of cancer patients suing Monsanto to have his case go to trial, the International Business Times reports. The California...
Newser1 day ago
Some of the materials used by the Oklahoma City County Health Department in the Teen Pregnancy Prevention program are on display at the health department in Oklahoma City, Monday, July 21, 2014. The 25th annual Kids Count report from the Baltimore-based Annie E. Casey Foundation ranked Oklahoma 39th in 16 indicators across four areas: economic well-being, education, health and family and community. Teen births among girls ages 15 to 19 years old decreased 13 percent, from 54 teen births per 1,000 in 2005 to 47 teen births per 1,000 in 2012. Several affiliates of Planned Parenthood are suing the Department of Health and Human Services over its efforts to impose an abstinence-only focus on its Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program that has served more than 1 million young people. The lawsuits were filed Friday, June 22, 2018, in federal courts in New York City and Spokane, Washington, by four different Planned Parenthood affiliates covering New York City and the states of Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Nebraska and Washington. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
Lawsuits challenge efforts to push abstinence-only on teensSeveral affiliates of Planned Parenthood are suing the Department of Health and Human Services over its efforts to impose an abstinence-only focus on its Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program that has served more than 1 million young people
The Associated Press2 days ago
FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2015 file photo supporters of a measure to allow terminally ill people to end their own life march at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. California health officials say 374 terminally ill people took drugs to end their lives in 2017, the first full year after a law making the option legal took effect. They added, 577 people received aid-in-dying drugs in 2017, but not everyone used them. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
Nearly 400 people used California assisted death law in 2017California health officials say 374 terminally ill people took drugs to end their lives last year in the first full year after a 2016 law made the option legal
The Associated Press2 days ago
House approves bill expanding treatment for opioid abuseThe House has overwhelmingly approved legislation designed to give health care providers more tools to stem an opioid crisis that kills more than 115 people in the United States daily
The Associated Press2 days ago
File - In this April 20, 2018 file photo, Zechariah Jacobs shops for marijuana at the Exhale Nevada dispensary in Las Vegas. Nevada's marijuana regulators say they are trying to keep up with demands at recreational dispensaries, where sales continue to outpace projections. The Nevada Appeal reports the Interim Finance Committee approved an additional $1.5 million for the Department of Taxation to hire more security guards and staff to process background checks for workers at marijuana facilities. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
Nevada pot regulators given more funds to deal with demandNevada's marijuana regulators are trying to keep up with demands at recreational dispensaries, where sales continue to outpace projections
The Associated Press2 days ago
FILE - In this Tuesday, June 12, 2018, file photo, warning signs near Provo Bay worn of harmful algae on parts of Utah Lake. Long linked to animal deaths, high doses of the toxins in humans can cause liver damage and attack the nervous system. In the largest outbreaks, hundreds have been sickened by blooms in reservoirs and lakes, and officials in some areas now routinely close bodies of water used for recreation and post warnings when blooms occur. (Rick Egan/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
Warming drives spread of toxic algae in US, researchers sayToxic algae blooms like one that prompted a recent drinking water advisory in Salem, Oregon, are happening more often and lasting longer across the U.S.
The Associated Press2 days ago
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